It must have been one of the strangest days in my life.

Met a 20 year old entrepreneur. Thought about how society’s age discrimination stands in the way of any successful partnerships between such young entrepreneurs and those who are twice their age. Then read about another entrepreneur who is doing a crazy thing: he wants to build his founding team based on 5-6 people who are all 35 or older. Yea, that’s right. He appreciates experience. In the world of “20 under” . Whatever happened to my “40 over 40” survey?

Should age become an obstacle? Should it be a consideration at all in the world of entrepreneurship? Personally I find that age is one of the last things I check for when a candidate applies. The relevancy of experience is much more important. Not to mention your online presence.

A couple of weeks ago I posted an ad on Xplace for a technological partner to join my startup. I made sure what I wrote is pretty clear. It’s a person, not a company, it’s a partnership, not a service, and it’s pre-funding. All of the replies I received except for one were from companies or freelancers who didn’t bother to read what I wrote, or decided that perhaps if they send me their lovely price proposal I will give up on a partner and come up with funds. Hmmm. But what made it even worse was the way some of these people responded: They didn’t bother to present themselves, their curriculum, their experience or portfolio. It was a “one-line-proposal” in the form of “tell me more about your project”.

Sorry, but I don’t get it. Or rather, I do get it. This is why these people are having trouble getting a position. Not because they are young or old. Because it’s all about how and what you communicate. We live in an age and a professional environement where age has the least significance it ever had. Whether you are 20 or 60 if you have a valid idea and you know how to communicate it – you have a chance at success.

So back to the 20 year old. This was a delightful encounter. I don’t know if something ever comes out of it. I offered my help as a mentor in marketing and business strategy aspects through the wonderful Tomorrow Israel  project started by my friend Nir Kouris. I had the pleasure of meeting one of the more mature entrepreneurs, acknowledging where his knowledge is insufficient and needs help, respecting his team say in any involvement of third parties. A refreshing look on a traditional line of apps. And a general impression that working with this entrepreneur (note I’m not calling him “a kid” or “a young…”) – working with such a person would be great.